The World Traveling Guide

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Beautiful Places That You Shouldn’t Miss If You Travel To Africa

If sometimes roads bring you to Africa be prepared to see one of the most beautiful and breath taking  places of the world. From magical islands to beautiful resorts, beaches, rivers and lakes Africa has to offer beauty, fun, great holiday and adventure for all. If we already interested you for Africa below you can find 13 beautiful places that we recommend as a must see!

Baobab Trees, Madagascar

Baobab Trees, Madagascar

Bazaruto Island, Mozambique 

Bazaruto Island, Mozambique

Blyde River Canyon is Mpumalanga, South Africa

Blyde River Canyon is Mpumalanga, South Africa

Chapman’s Peak Drive from above, near Cape Town, South Africa

Chapman’s Peak Drive from above, near Cape Town, South Africa

Constance Tsarabanjina Resort – Madagascar

Constance Tsarabanjina Resort – Madagascar

Lake Malawi, Malawi

Lake Malawi, Malawi

Marrakech, Morocco

Marrakech, Morocco

Mozambique’s six-island Bazaruto Archipelago, in the Indian Ocean

Mozambique’s six-island Bazaruto Archipelago, in the Indian Ocean

Nile River, Egypt

Nile River, Egypt

Reunion Island, Madagascar

Reunion Island, Madagascar

Sesriem Canyon

Sesriem Canyon

Timia Oasis, Niger

Timia Oasis, Niger

Zanzibar, Tanzania, Africa

Zanzibar, Tanzania, Africa

So what do YOU think, isn’t AFRICA an AMAZING place?

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Luanda

Luanda, formerly named São Paulo da Assunção de Loanda, is the capital and largest city of Angola, in Southern Africa. Located on Angola’s coast with the Atlantic Ocean, Luanda is both Angola’s chief seaport and its administrative center. It has a metropolitan population of over 5 million. It is also the capital city of Luanda Province, and the world’s third most populous Portuguese-speaking city, behind only São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, both in Brazil, and the most populous Portuguese-speaking capital in the world, ahead of Brasília, Maputo and Lisbon.

Angolan President Not To Seek Re-Election

Luanda was founded in 1575 under the name São Paulo de Loanda by a hundred families of settlers and four hundred soldiers. Two forts were constructed in the early 17th century and the city became Portuguese Angola’s administrative center in 1627. From the late 16th century until 1836, Luanda was port where nearly all slaves bound for Brazil left. Aside from a brief period of Dutch rule (1640-48), this time period was relatively uneventful, with Luanda growing much like many other colonial cities, albeit with a strong Brazilian influence as a result of the extensive shipping trade between these Portuguese colonies.

Luanda_Bay

With the independence of Brazil in 1822 and the end of slavery in 1836 left Luanda’s future looking bleak, but the opening of the city’s port to foreign ships in 1844 led the a great economic boom. By 1850, the city was arguably the most developed and one of the greatest cities in the Portuguese empire outside Portugal itself and fueled by trade in palm and peanut oil, wax, copal, timber, ivory, cotton, coffee, and cocoa. Post-emancipation (resisted by the Portuguese but enforced by the British) forced labour began. Numerous imported crops grew well in the surrounding area to support residents, such as maize, tobacco, and cassava. In 1889, an aqueduct opened, supplying fresh water and removing the only inhibitor to growth in the city. The city blossomed even during the Portuguese Colonial War (1961-74), which did not affect the city, and this modern city was even labeled the “Paris of Africa” in 1972

Luanda2

After so much success, the city took a turn for the worse in the mid-1970s. While largely untouched during the Carnation Revolution (Angolan independence), the start of the Angolan Civil War in 1975 scared almost all Angola’s population of Portuguese descent out of the country as refugees (including the majority of Luanda’s population). This led to an immediate crisis as Angola’s African population knew little about how to run or maintain the city. They were helped a little by skilled Cuban soldiers who were able to help the MPLA government maintain some of the city’s basic services, but hundreds of thousands of refugees who fled fighting in the countryside created slums stretching for miles on all sides of the city.

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The city saw some sporadic fighting during the Civil War which left bullet holes in many highrises and government building. When peace was reached in 2002, the government began planning to rebuild using oil revenues. Today Luanda’s skyline is dotted with cranes, erecting numerous social housing highrises to replace slums and existing, but grossly dilapidated, 40-plus year old highrises as well as offices for numerous foreign companies operating in Angola. Just South of Luanda in an area aptly called Luanda Sul, Western-standard housing, many compound style, is being built for the growing expat community. Major improvements are being made to roads, highways, and the rail system in and around the city but there is yet an overwhelming amount of work to be done. And while certainly still home to a large impoverished population (59%), free housing and the creation of thousands of new jobs each year means that Luanda may in years to come have a bright future ahead.

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Luanda has a mild semi-arid climate. The climate is warm to hot but surprisingly dry, owing to the cool Benguela Current, which prevents moisture from easily condensing into rain. Frequent fog prevents temperatures from falling at night even during the completely dry months from June to October. Luanda has an annual rainfall of 323 millimetres, but the variability is among the highest in the world, with a co-efficient of variation above 40 percent. Observed records since 1858 range from 55 millimetres (2.2 in) in 1958 to 851 millimetres (33.5 in) in 1916. The short rainy season in March and April depends on a northerly counter current bringing moisture to the city: it has been shown clearly that weakness in the Benguela current can increase rainfall about six fold compared with years when that current is strong.


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Madagascar

Madagascar, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Southeast Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar (the fourth-largest island in the world), as well as numerous smaller peripheral islands.

madagascar_the world traveling guide

Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar split from India around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90 percent of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth. The island’s diverse ecosystems and unique wildlife are threatened by the encroachment of the rapidly growing human population.

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

Initial human settlement of Madagascar occurred between 350 BC and 550 AD by Austronesian peoples arriving on outrigger canoes from Borneo. These were joined around 1000 CE by Bantu migrants crossing the Mozambique Channel. Other groups continued to settle on Madagascar over time, each one making lasting contributions to Malagasy cultural life. The Malagasy ethnic group is often divided into eighteen or more sub-groups of which the largest are the Merina of the central highlands.

 

 

madagascar3Until the late 18th century, the island of Madagascar was ruled by a fragmented assortment of shifting socio-political alliances. Beginning in the early 19th century, most of the island was united and ruled as the Kingdom of Madagascar by a series of Merina nobles. The monarchy collapsed in 1897 when the island was absorbed into the French colonial empire, from which the island gained independence in 1960.

Tsarabanjina  - The world traveling guide

Tsarabanjina – The world traveling guide

The autonomous state of Madagascar has since undergone four major constitutional periods, termed Republics. Since 1992 the nation has officially been governed as a constitutional democracy from its capital at Antananarivo. However, in a popular uprising in 2009 the last elected president Marc Ravalomanana was made to resign and presidential power was transferred in March 2009 to Andry Rajoelina in a move widely viewed by the international community as a coup d’état.

Madagascar eastern coast - The world traveling guide

Madagascar eastern coast – The world traveling guide

Madagascar is probably of the most interesting countries in the world, because of its specific flora and fauna that is one of the reasons for so many visitors, including scientists. The islands offer the adventure of the rainforest to those who love hiking and trekking. While hiking you may see the unique fauna of the islands, lemurs and sifakas are certainly most famous. Although it is harder to spot them while in the rainforest,they can easily be seen in the drier places of the island.

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You may also see many species of amphibians and lizards and many birds. Of the flora there are many things to see, like the great variety of palms, the endemic baobab trees and the plenty of orchids.

Madagascar

Once you are tired of hiking, you may go down the trail and end up on some of the islands beautiful beaches with gentle sands and clear waters. There are many deserted beaches, with only the wildlife around you will relax and enjoy. On one of the most famous parts of Madagascar, the tropical island of Nosy Be, are many beautiful beaches, and a wide range of hotels and restaurants. While in Nosy Be you can go scuba diving or snorkeling, wind or kite surfing or deep sea fishing.

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The capital city of Madagascar is Antananavario and it is the largest city, this is a city with unique architecture mixing the old stylish wooden houses with modern architecture and colonial buildings in French style. There are many churches to visit, and many open air markets known by the name Zomas. In Madagascar one should try the bananas, there is a huge number of varieties, there is also plenty of tropical fruits you can try and off course the coffee, which is handmade and irresistible.

Antananarivo - The world traveling guide

Antananarivo – The world traveling guide

Most Air France flights arrive in Tana close to midnight (and depart about an hour later) so that the visitor to Madagascar’s capital is likely to arrive and depart in darkness. The ten-mile drive into the city passes through not-quite slums and modest residential areas and arrives in a hilly colonial city of great charm.

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Independence Avenue (or Arabe Fahaleovantena as it is known in Malagasy) runs from the railway station, along the valley formed by two ridges which converge, effectively trapping the lower town or Analakely.  Steep streets and alleys and many flights of stairs lead to the upper town made up of Antaninarenina and Isoraka.  The main staircase which leads for Avenue de l’Independence (French is Madagascar’s second official language) to Place de l’Independence is wide enough to have vendors on both sides selling rubber stamps, wood carvings, raffia goods and other local crafts.  The square at the top has a garden on one side and Le Buffet de Jardin on the other where one can recover from the climb with a fruit juice or an expensive (and inferior) glass of wine.  By far the best choice is a tall glass of Three Horses Beer.