The World Traveling Guide

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Beautiful Places That You Shouldn’t Miss If You Travel To Africa

If sometimes roads bring you to Africa be prepared to see one of the most beautiful and breath taking  places of the world. From magical islands to beautiful resorts, beaches, rivers and lakes Africa has to offer beauty, fun, great holiday and adventure for all. If we already interested you for Africa below you can find 13 beautiful places that we recommend as a must see!

Baobab Trees, Madagascar

Baobab Trees, Madagascar

Bazaruto Island, Mozambique 

Bazaruto Island, Mozambique

Blyde River Canyon is Mpumalanga, South Africa

Blyde River Canyon is Mpumalanga, South Africa

Chapman’s Peak Drive from above, near Cape Town, South Africa

Chapman’s Peak Drive from above, near Cape Town, South Africa

Constance Tsarabanjina Resort – Madagascar

Constance Tsarabanjina Resort – Madagascar

Lake Malawi, Malawi

Lake Malawi, Malawi

Marrakech, Morocco

Marrakech, Morocco

Mozambique’s six-island Bazaruto Archipelago, in the Indian Ocean

Mozambique’s six-island Bazaruto Archipelago, in the Indian Ocean

Nile River, Egypt

Nile River, Egypt

Reunion Island, Madagascar

Reunion Island, Madagascar

Sesriem Canyon

Sesriem Canyon

Timia Oasis, Niger

Timia Oasis, Niger

Zanzibar, Tanzania, Africa

Zanzibar, Tanzania, Africa

So what do YOU think, isn’t AFRICA an AMAZING place?

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Barbados

Barbados is endowed with 113km (70 miles) of beaches so first time visitors can be forgiven for heading straight for the sand and surf. Most tourists flock to the island’s legendary Platinum Coast to the west, which is lined with world-class, luxury resorts, spa hotels, sophisticated restaurants and manicured golf courses, all lapped by the limpid Caribbean Sea. The south coast has some of the best beaches while the east coast, pummelled by the Altantic Ocean, is less developed and attracts mainly surfers.

Although Barbados’s interior is unremarkable compared to its Caribbean neighbours, a jeep safari provides the best way to discover crumbling sugar mills, historic plantation houses, traditional churches reminiscent of England and colonial Bridgetown. The capital, and the nearby Garrison site, were granted UNESCO World Heritage status in 2012.

Combine this with Barbados’s indelible laid-back vibe, its passion for rum (over 1,500 rum shops dot the island) and calypso-infused festivals, and it’s no wonder people return here time and time again.

Things to see and do

Bridgetown

Barbados’s capital Bridgetown – named after a crude bridge constructed by early Indian settlers – is the best place to enjoy the island’s colonial history.

Visit National Heroes Square, which boasts a statue of Lord Nelson, which was erected in 1813, well before Nelson’s Column was put up in London. Nearby are the neogothic Parliament Buildings, Bridgetown Synagogue (reputed to the oldest in the western hemisphere) and the pretty, pink pastel coloured facades of DaCosta’s Mall. When you tire of sightseeing, pop into one of the ubiquitous rum shops or head for a drink at the Waterfront area overlooking the marina.

Bridgetown

Chalky Mount Potteries

Barbados’s famous Chalky Mount potters are renowned for their high-quality inexpensive art. You can watch the local potters at work at the wheel fashioning centuries-old designs – a respected 300-year-old tradition.

Chalky Mount Potteries

Crane Beach

The baby-pink sands of cliff-flanked Crane Beach, an idyllic spot that is one of the most beautiful on the island, are perfect for a stroll. Moderate, foamy waves draw a body-surfing crowd and there are plenty of shaded spots to chill out until the magical sunsets arrive.

Crane Beach

Cricket

Cricket is the national sporting obsession, with Barbados hosting the World Twenty20 finals in 2010 at the newly expanded Kensington Oval pitch near Bridgetown.

Choose from barefoot village friendlies to international and local club cups – where many of the great names of West Indian cricket are honoured, most notably Sir Garfield Sobers.

Cricket

East Coast Road

Barbados’s East Coast Road, hemmed by crashing Atlantic waves, is one of the island’s most exciting drives. A rugged coastal route overlooks treacherous reefs while an inland road weaves through rolling sugarcane to quaint plantation towns topped by church steeples. One of the most popular destinations on the east coast is Bathsheba, where giant coral boulders, which have broken away from ancient coral reefs over thousands of years, offer striking photograph opportunities. Bathsheba is also the location for the legendary Soup Bowl surfing competition.

East Coast Road

Fishing

Wahoo, dorado, barracuda, tuna and sailfish, together with mighty blue marlin and shark, all patrol Barbados’s deep sea waters. There are plenty of game fishing tournaments and inshore competitions to join or just grab a rod and head to the jetty.

Harrison’s Cave

With an abundance of stalactites, stalagmites, streams, lakes and waterfalls, Harrison’s Cave is a jaw-dropping spectacle. The caves, in the parish of St. Thomas, were first mentioned in historical documents in 1795 and then virtually forgotten for nearly 200 years, until being rediscovered in 1976.

In 1981, Harrison’s Cave was opened to the public. Visitors can enjoy a scenic trail from the clifftop to the valley floor, before entering the caves on a 40-minute journey in an electric cart led by guides. Self-guides walks are also possible.

Harrison’s Cave

Horse riding

It’s possible to gallop along the beach at sundown or simply trek along inland trails. Over two-dozen horse-riding events take place on the Garrison Savannah. Polo is also played to a high level by fiercely competitive Barbadian teams.

Scuba diving

Barbados’s rainbow of coral reefs offers a pristine watery home to seahorses, sponges and giant sand eels. Hidden caves and shipwrecks provide plenty of underwater nooks and crannies along a shoreline nested by Hawksbill Turtles.

Taste the oldest rum in the world

Mount Gay Rum, on the island’s west coast, can trace its heritage back to 1703, making it the world’s oldest rum producer. Made from the sugar cane that thrived across the island, Barbados was once the favoured tipple of English sailors.

Visitors can learn about the refining, aging, blending and bottling process on tastings and tours, which run hourly between Monday-Saturday.

The Barbados Wildlife Reserve

The Barbados Wildlife Reserve’s resplendent mahogany forest is the roaming territory of green monkeys, tortoises, deer, raccoons, pelicans and otters. A walk-through aviary allows a leafy stroll with peacocks, turkeys, toucans, parrots, flamingoes, pelicans, lovebirds and macaws.

Wildlife Reserve

Viewpoints

Lofty Mount Hillaby, the island’s highest point at 343m (1,125ft), offers incredible panoramas across the east, west and northern coasts. Dramatic vistas also abound from St John’s Parish Church over miles of jagged coastline and moss-covered family vaults dotted with tropical flora.

Watersports

The island’s rugged south and west coasts boast world-class watersports where windsurfers, jet skiers, parasailers and water skiers enjoy perfect conditions. To ride the waves head to the Soup Bowl, South Point and Rockley Beach, Barbados’s surfing mecca.

Whizz through the rainforest at Walkes Spring

Aerial Trek Zipline Adventures offers soft adventure thrills as you whizz through the rainforest at Jack-in-the-box Gully, Walkes Spring, in the centre of the island. The scenic ride began operations in 2007 and is proving popular. Advance bookings are recommended.
Nightlife in Barbados

Nightlife in Barbados
Bajans love to party with nightlife options in Barbados ranging from clubs, beach bars and pubs to rum shops, dinner shows and twilight boat cruises. Music ranges fom calypso and reggae to the latest R’n’B.
Most of the main nightlife spots are concentrated around the south and west coasts. St Lawrence Gap is the liveliest nightlife spot on the islands; it’s a one-street affair lined with smart pubs, clubs and bars. If you want to party with the locals, head to Oistins Fish Market on a Friday or Saturday night, where Bajans dance to the early hours in the open air with music ranging from country and western to the latest calypso.


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Dublin

Dublin is the capital and most populous city of Ireland. The English name for the city is derived from the Irish name Dubhlinn, meaning “black pool”. Dublin is situated in the province of Leinster near the midpoint of Ireland’s east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and the centre of the Dublin Region.

Dublin-The world traveling guide

Founded as a Viking settlement, it evolved into the Kingdom of Dublin and became the island’s principal city following the Norman invasion. The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century; it was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire and the fifth largest in Europe. Dublin entered a period of stagnation following the Act of Union of 1800, but it remained the economic centre for most of the island. Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, the new parliament, the Oireachtas, was located in Leinster House. Dublin became the capital of the Irish Free State and later the Republic of Ireland.

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Like the cities of Cork, Limerick, Galway and Waterford, Dublin is administered separately from its respective County with its own City Council. The city is listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) as a global city, with a ranking of “Alpha-“, placing Dublin among the top 30 cities in the world. It is a historical and contemporary cultural centre for the country, as well as a modern centre of education, the arts, administration, economy, and industry.

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Founded in 841, Dublin was originally settled by Vikings amongst a population of Celtic tribes. In the 9th century the Danes captured Dublin and had control until 1171 when they were expelled by King Henry II of England. By the 14th century the king of England controlled Dublin and the nearby area referred to as “the Pale”.

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When the English Civil Wars ended in 1649, Oliver Cromwell took over. Dublin experienced huge growth and development in the 17th century because many Protestant refugees from Europe came to Dublin. By the 17th century Dublin was the second greatest city, only behind London, and a period when great Georgian style building were constructed that still stand today. Georgian style architecture was popular from 1720 to 1840 during the times when George I, George II, George III, and George IV of England were ruling.

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In 1800, the Act of Union between Great Britain and Ireland abolished the Irish Parliament. From this point on, the Irish worked to gain their independence from Great Britain, which they finally won in 1922. The Easter rising in 1916 and the War of Independence greatly helped Ireland win their freedom. One event remembered as a key moment in Irish history is the Easter rising in 1916.

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A failed attempt to take over the several important buildings, among them the General Post Office on O’Connell Street, led to the arrest of hundreds and execution of 15, now considered martyrs for the cause. Many believe that this event helped gain sympathy for the fight for independence from Britain.

Being subject to the moderating effects of the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf Stream, Dublin is known for its mild climate.

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Contrary to some popular perception, the city is not especially rainy. Its annual rainfall average is only 732.7mm (28.8 in), lower than London. However, its precipitation is spread out more evenly so that on many days there can be a light shower.

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Winters in Dublin are relatively mild when compared with cities in mainland Europe -daytime temperatures generally hover around the 5°C (41°F), but frost is common during the period November through to February when night time temperatures dip below 0°C (32 °F) freezing point.

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Snow does occur, but it is not very common, and most of Dublin’s winter precipitation comes in the form of a chilly rain and hail. The lowest recorded temperature in the city is -12°C (10°F). It should also be noted that during the first week of January 2010, the city canals froze over for the first time in years–this was a common enough sight back in the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s. It could be said that Dublin’s climate is very comparable to that of the northwest United States and southwest Canada, as well as to much of coastal Western Europe.

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Summers in Dublin are also mild. The average maximum temperature is 19°C (66°F) in July, far cooler than even most of the coldest American cities. The hottest temperature ever recorded in Dublin is a mere 29°C (87°F), which in many other parts of the world, even at its own latitude, is just a typical summer day. Don’t plan on too many hot summertime activities. Thunderstorms also don’t happen very often in Dublin, on average only four days a year. Overall, the city’s climate is mild but would be considered drier and cooler than western and southern parts of the island of Ireland.

 


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Malta

Malta  is a southern European country in the Mediterranean Sea. It lies 80 km south of Sicily, 284 km  east of Tunisia and 333 km  north of Libya. The country covers just over 316 km2, making it one of the world’s smallest and most densely populated countries. The capital of Malta is Valletta, which is also the smallest capital in the EU at 0.8 km2. Malta has two official languages: Maltese and English.

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Malta’s location as a naval base has given it great strategic importance throughout history, and a succession of powers including the Phoenicians, Romans, Moorish, Normans, Aragonese, Habsburg Spain, Knights of St. John, French and the British have ruled the islands. Malta gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1964 and became a republic in 1974. Malta was admitted to the United Nations in 1964 and to the European Union in 2004; in 2008, it became part of the eurozone.

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Malta has a long Christian legacy and is an Apostolic see. According to the Acts of the Apostles, St. Paul was shipwrecked on Malta.Catholicism is the official religion in Malta.

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Malta is a favoured tourist destination with its warm climate, numerous recreational areas, and architectural and historical monuments, including nine UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Hal Saflieni Hypogeum, Valletta and seven Megalithic Temples which are some of the oldest free-standing structures in the world.

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Malta is an archipelago in the central Mediterranean (in its eastern basin), some 80 km  south of the Italian island of Sicily across the Malta Channel. Only the three largest islands – Malta (Malta), Gozo(Għawdex) and Comino (Kemmuna) – are inhabited. The smaller islands (see below) are uninhabited. The islands of the archipelago lie on the Malta plateau, a shallow shelf formed from the high points of a land bridge between Sicily and North Africa that became isolated as sea levels rose after the last Ice Age. The archipelago is therefore situated in the zone between the Eurasian and African tectonic plates.

Malta1

Numerous bays along the indented coastline of the islands provide good harbours. The landscape consists of low hills with terraced fields. The highest point in Malta is Ta’ Dmejrek, at 253 m (830 ft), near Dingli. Although there are some small rivers at times of high rainfall, there are no permanent rivers or lakes on Malta. However, some watercourses have fresh water running all year round at Baħrija near Ras ir-Raħeb, at l-Imtaħleb and San Martin, and at Lunzjata Valley in Gozo.

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Malta is a popular tourist destination, with 1.2 million tourists per year. Three times more tourists visit than there are residents. Tourism infrastructure has increased dramatically over the years and a number of good-quality hotels are present on the island, although overdevelopment and the destruction of traditional housing is of growing concern. An increasing number of Maltese now travel abroad on holiday.

malta

In recent years, Malta has advertised itself as a medical tourism destination, and a number of health tourism providers are developing the industry. However, no Maltese hospital has undergone independent international healthcare accreditation. Malta is popular with British medical tourists,pointing Maltese hospitals towards seeking UK-sourced accreditation, such as with the Trent Accreditation Scheme. Dual accreditation with the American-oriented Joint Commission is necessary if hospitals in Malta wish to compete with the Far East and Latin America for medical tourists from the United States.


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Bahamas

The Bahamas extends 760 miles from the coast of Florida on the north-west almost to Haiti on the south-east. The group consists of 700 islands, of which 30 are inhabited, and about 2,400 cays (coral reefs).

 

Bahamas - The world traveling guide

Bahamas – The world traveling guide

When Christopher Columbus arrived in 1492 on San Salvador, The Islands Of The Bahamas were inhabited by Lucayans, a subgroup of Arawak indians. Slavery, disease and other hardships wiped out the entire tribe within 25 years of Columbus’ arrival.

 

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

British settlement in The Bahamas was established in 1647 by a group of English settlers in search for religious freedom, the Company of Eleutheran Adventurers, who organized a community on what is now the island of Eleuthera; in 1783 the Islands Of The Bahamas became a British colony.

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During the late 17th and early 18th centuries, piracy flourished in the islands because of their proximity to important shipping lanes.

 

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

Today The Bahamas has become one of the world’s foremost vacation resorts. Nassau is the political capital and the commercial hub of The Bahamas. Tourism and international banking and investment management accounts for more than 55% of the country’s gross domestic product.

 

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

The official language spoken in the Bahamas is English, however the dialect and slang is difficult for most Westerners and Europeans to understand, especially on the “out islands.”

The locals speak very fast and use indigenous phrases. They are very friendly though, and will always help. With the exception of Nassau, violent crimes, and crimes in general, are almost non-existent in the Bahamas.

 

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

The populace is predictably friendly and more religious than one might expect: the Bahamas have one of the highest ratios of churches per capita in the world, with Baptists being the largest single group. Local newspapers will reveal religious references by elected officials in a manner that exceeds what would be found in the United States.

 

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

This devotion does nothing to prohibit the activities of visitors nor is it intended to. There is a very “libertarian” attitude about personal morals.

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Wildlife in Bahamas contains various species. Many different breed of crabs can be found on the beaches. Hermit and Cardisoma guanhumi are two of the land crabs to be noted frequently in the island. The wild horses of Abaco are famous in The Bahamas.

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During a tour of the Bahamas, tourists can come across various other species including the Bahamas Hutia, numerous frogs, rocky raccoon, snails such as Cerion, cicada, blind cave fish, ants and reptiles.

Bahamas Wildlife features a wide range of amazing birds. Parrots and pigeons are two of the most common and popular birds found in The Bahamas.

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The Bahamas is also home to numerous aquatic life. Sharks, manatees, dolphins, frogfish, angelfish, starfish and turtles can be viewed in the waters surrounding The Bahamas. Apart from numerous species of fish, tourists can spot several types of worms also.

 

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

The climate of the Bahamas is tropical savannah or Aw. As such, there has never been a frost or freeze ever reported anywhere in the Bahamas – although every few decades low temperatures can fall into the 38°F to 45°F (3°C to 5°C) range for a few hours when a severe cold outbreak comes off the North American landmass. Otherwise, the low latitude, warm tropical Gulf Stream, and low elevation give the Bahamas a warm and winterless climate. There is only a 12°F difference between the warmest month and coolest month in most of the Bahama Islands.

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Like most tropical climates, seasonal rainfall follows the sun, and summer is the wettest season. The Bahamas are often sunny and dry for long periods of time, and average more than 3000 hours of sunlight annually.

Although rare, tropical cyclones can impact the Bahamas. In 1992 Hurricane Andrew passed over the northern portions of the Islands, and Hurricane Floyd passed near the eastern portions of the islands in 1999.

 


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Madagascar

Madagascar, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Southeast Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar (the fourth-largest island in the world), as well as numerous smaller peripheral islands.

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Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar split from India around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90 percent of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth. The island’s diverse ecosystems and unique wildlife are threatened by the encroachment of the rapidly growing human population.

The world traveling guide

The world traveling guide

Initial human settlement of Madagascar occurred between 350 BC and 550 AD by Austronesian peoples arriving on outrigger canoes from Borneo. These were joined around 1000 CE by Bantu migrants crossing the Mozambique Channel. Other groups continued to settle on Madagascar over time, each one making lasting contributions to Malagasy cultural life. The Malagasy ethnic group is often divided into eighteen or more sub-groups of which the largest are the Merina of the central highlands.

 

 

madagascar3Until the late 18th century, the island of Madagascar was ruled by a fragmented assortment of shifting socio-political alliances. Beginning in the early 19th century, most of the island was united and ruled as the Kingdom of Madagascar by a series of Merina nobles. The monarchy collapsed in 1897 when the island was absorbed into the French colonial empire, from which the island gained independence in 1960.

Tsarabanjina  - The world traveling guide

Tsarabanjina – The world traveling guide

The autonomous state of Madagascar has since undergone four major constitutional periods, termed Republics. Since 1992 the nation has officially been governed as a constitutional democracy from its capital at Antananarivo. However, in a popular uprising in 2009 the last elected president Marc Ravalomanana was made to resign and presidential power was transferred in March 2009 to Andry Rajoelina in a move widely viewed by the international community as a coup d’état.

Madagascar eastern coast - The world traveling guide

Madagascar eastern coast – The world traveling guide

Madagascar is probably of the most interesting countries in the world, because of its specific flora and fauna that is one of the reasons for so many visitors, including scientists. The islands offer the adventure of the rainforest to those who love hiking and trekking. While hiking you may see the unique fauna of the islands, lemurs and sifakas are certainly most famous. Although it is harder to spot them while in the rainforest,they can easily be seen in the drier places of the island.

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You may also see many species of amphibians and lizards and many birds. Of the flora there are many things to see, like the great variety of palms, the endemic baobab trees and the plenty of orchids.

Madagascar

Once you are tired of hiking, you may go down the trail and end up on some of the islands beautiful beaches with gentle sands and clear waters. There are many deserted beaches, with only the wildlife around you will relax and enjoy. On one of the most famous parts of Madagascar, the tropical island of Nosy Be, are many beautiful beaches, and a wide range of hotels and restaurants. While in Nosy Be you can go scuba diving or snorkeling, wind or kite surfing or deep sea fishing.

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The capital city of Madagascar is Antananavario and it is the largest city, this is a city with unique architecture mixing the old stylish wooden houses with modern architecture and colonial buildings in French style. There are many churches to visit, and many open air markets known by the name Zomas. In Madagascar one should try the bananas, there is a huge number of varieties, there is also plenty of tropical fruits you can try and off course the coffee, which is handmade and irresistible.

Antananarivo - The world traveling guide

Antananarivo – The world traveling guide

Most Air France flights arrive in Tana close to midnight (and depart about an hour later) so that the visitor to Madagascar’s capital is likely to arrive and depart in darkness. The ten-mile drive into the city passes through not-quite slums and modest residential areas and arrives in a hilly colonial city of great charm.

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Independence Avenue (or Arabe Fahaleovantena as it is known in Malagasy) runs from the railway station, along the valley formed by two ridges which converge, effectively trapping the lower town or Analakely.  Steep streets and alleys and many flights of stairs lead to the upper town made up of Antaninarenina and Isoraka.  The main staircase which leads for Avenue de l’Independence (French is Madagascar’s second official language) to Place de l’Independence is wide enough to have vendors on both sides selling rubber stamps, wood carvings, raffia goods and other local crafts.  The square at the top has a garden on one side and Le Buffet de Jardin on the other where one can recover from the climb with a fruit juice or an expensive (and inferior) glass of wine.  By far the best choice is a tall glass of Three Horses Beer.